Tag: facebook

Hijackers Attempt Sabotage of WTF Magazine

Image of a message from a fake Facebook account.
He’s part a group of fan page hijackers, and WTF Magazine is not his only target.

WTF Magazine has been rebuilding their presence on Facebook after their old fan page was deleted.  On Tuesday, Jason Fyk and his admin team have had to ban several fans.

It turns out they aren’t who they say they are.

They tried adding 400 fake accounts to my personal page and are currently adding a flood of fake accounts to WTF Magazine.” Fyk said.

A screenshot of fake accounts that were banned.
Here’s a list of some Facebook accounts that were banned from the WTF fanpage.

This isn’t the first time he’s dealt with this group.  Business Insider has details on a group dedicated to hijacking fan pages for fun and profit.

Hijackers send a flood of fake likes to a fan page so they can report content that is posted.  “Jack Evans along with Austin Harrig, Anthony Machia (Ortiz), Ken Ballou, George Portillo, Dexter Hyman and others have attacked us without cause for years.” Fyk said.

Pages that reach 100,000 likes are a prime target for the group lead by Evans.

Duplicate accounts are used to hijack pages.
Note how the same name appears twice.

In some cases, duplicate accounts are created.  They can be used to evade banning while continually harassing the intended target.

The group is known as “The Community,” and their profile claims to be against cyber bullying.  The group’s description is only a ruse.

The hijacking of pages began as a way of pulling pranks and was only for fun before things got serious.

Now it can be done for fun and profit.

Below are a couple of screenshots showing the impact of fake likes.

Screencap showing impact on WTF's fan page as a result of fake likes.
“The idea is to add the fake accounts and use those to report everything. This kills the reach on the page.” Fyk said.
These are the likes on his personal page. The spike in organic likes caught his attention.
Note the spike in organic likes on his personal page.

“I managed to get 99% off my personal page but that was a small page and 400 likes in 2 hours is noticeable.” Fyk said.

The lack of legal precedent has left little recourse, though Anthony Ortiz appears to admit some wrong doing in his interview with Alyson Shontell, especially when it comes to defamation.

The only current recourse is to continually ban fake accounts.  We’ll keep everyone here updated as new information becomes available.

WTF Booted from Facebook

 

"No facebook" by --Steindy (talk) 20:42, 16 September 2013 (UTC) - https://twitter.com/facebook. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:No_facebook.png#mediaviewer/File:No_facebook.png
“No facebook” by —Steindy (talk) 20:42, 16 September 2013 (UTC) – Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Social Media has its ups and downs.  One moment, a group or a page is popular.  The next day, it’s gone.

Such was the case with WTF Magazine, an online fun publication.  For four years, Jason Fyk built an audience of 2.1 million on Facebook.  He invested approximately $100,000 USD in advertising.

Out of nowhere, the fan page was removed.

In terms of content, Fyk explained, “There are always people that do not like things we post. No one likes everything. However if you judge our content off the number of banned pictures as compared to the number we post we stay well within the guidelines of Facebook terms of service.

In the four years of operation, 20 pictures and five links were banned.  In the previous three months, only this link was banned.  As for other content, Fyk told me, “Anything to do with [the] Muslim religion gets us being reported into the ground. People get fanatical and its a shame that a few people have a say over that of the masses.

In response to accusations of dismembered people being posted, he told me that it simply wasn’t true.  “You need to realize we have a group of haters that are already at it trying to sabotage our page. They do what is called Social Engineering. What that is, is saying stuff like that, which people don’t know is true or false.” Fyk said.

Page admins have strict instructions to not post racial slurs, child pornography, or attacks on religion.

We do make fun of the fanatical groups which makes fun of feminists sometimes but I’d also make fun of fat people and I am one.” Fyk said.

Screenshot of a private conversation between an offended user and a WTF Magazine page admin.
First, the user in question says they’re in the photo. Then they see they don’t find it funny.

A picture of two turtles of all things was reported.  While the user initially messaged the page to remove it because they were in it, the admin asked where in the image they were at.  Their story changed.

They then said they simply didn’t find it funny and that one of their grandchildren’s friends shared the image.

There is no reason two turtles are a problem for facebook. Yet it was reported by some overly sensitive individual. But again, it’s not dismembered bodies, torture, self mutilation or anything even close.” Fyk said.

The website’s primary source of revenue is advertising, which is affected by web traffic.  Thanks to the fan page, they were able to support a number of families, two of which who have members who are special needs.

“One is an adult who is mildly retarded.  The other is a downs syndrome child.” Fyk said.

Since the page was deleted, the publication has been set back four years.  Despite this, Fyk plans to support those families until they recover.

In order to rebuild, they are no longer relying on advertising alone.  “I can’t announce everything but I am bringing in the CEO of another major publication to help out.”  Fyk said.

If the original page is republished, they will emphasize the website instead of solely relying on Facebook.  “Our fans won’t like it as much but they will have to come to the site to see the crazier stuff.” Fyk said.

There are also plans of moving beyond Facebook and expanding to other social media sites.  This includes building a social media network as well.  Regarding additional frustrations, Fyk told me that, “Facebook would not give us a verified brand check mark though we were an established tax paying business.

Their new fan page may be found here.  For those interested in checking out their website, it may be found here.

Friday Epic Fail: BSA’s Horrible Ad

BSA FB AD Part 1
You’re kidding, right?

By Thomas Holbrook II

I remember the good old days of relying on Microsoft.  I used everything from Windows to Office.  I even used Visual Basic for a while.

The problem is that said software costs several hundred dollars in the U.S. alone.  Even the subscription model can get expensive after a while.

That’s why so called “software piracy” has run rampant throughout the years.  While many would love for companies and individuals to be compensated for the work done, bending them over and violating their hind quarters without so much as a happy reach around was not a good incentive to be “moral and ethical” about installing software.

Then again, this is the same organization that referred to ACTA as a treaty, when in fact it wasn’t.  Since they do tend to act like a mafia, it shouldn’t be too surprising.

Little girl with an eye patch with a caption, "Look Mommy!  The BSA!
They’re afraid we’ll corrupt the youth. Original image thanks to this awesome person under this fantastic license.

So there I was on my lunch quietly scrolling through Facebook when something showed up on my feed that caused me to die a little on the inside.  The big push is for people to turn others in for cash rewards.

This reminded me of another ad that got trolled.  Instead of an actor who was blown up to look like Hercules through the magic of photo editing, we have, “Hey!  Snitch on others you know for money!  Yeah!   Money!”

Needless to say, the ad didn’t go over well.

BSA FB AD Part 2
Maybe one should report themselves to see what happens. Then again, that’s like placing a hot iron on your no no parts for curiosity’s sake.

From being called scum to being asked if they’d pay for a person’s software if they turned themselves in, is a clear demonstration that the people at the BSA are not the brightest stars in the sky.

Why in the world would they pay for an ad on Facebook?

Who knows.  Maybe they just want to throw everything out there and see what sticks.  At the end of the day, BSA is this week’s Friday Epic Fail!